Review

Blood & Milk by N.R. Walker | Review

Blood and Milk NR WalkerBlood & Milk by N.R. Walker was a profound and moving book about the healing power of love.

Heath is so broken in the beginning of the story. He’s lost his whole life to an act of hatred and is lost. A prophetic dream leads him to a Maasai tribe. Even though he doesn’t know what he’s going to do there, he goes anyway.

While the premise may be a bit shaky, I couldn’t help but feel for Heath. His loss was so profound he can’t seem to move on.

With prose that were often as sweeping and majestic as the Serengeti, N.R. Walker succeeds in taking the reader on a journey of self-discovery. Damu and Heath find in each other acceptance, kindness, and love.

With so much to love in this book, it’s hard to pick a few things to highlight. My favorite part, though, had to be how Damu and Heath cared for each other. Through sickness, injury, and nightmares, they always put each other first.

This book won’t be for everyone and that’s fine, but I found the characters and setting to be nuanced and interesting. Blood & Milk isn’t like many other books but it does exemplify that things like love, family, and pain are universal.

Copy provided in exchange for a fair and honest review.

Rating: ★★★★1/2

Blurb:

Heath Crowley is an Australian man, born with two different coloured eyes and the gift—or curse—of having premonition dreams. He also has nothing left to live for. Twelve months after having his life upended, his dreams tell him where he needs to be. So with nothing―and no one―to keep him in Sydney, he simply boards a plane for Tanzania. Not caring if he lives or dies, Heath walks into a tribe of Maasai and asks to stay. Granted permission, he leaves behind the name and heartbreak of Heath and starts over with the new Maasai name of Alé.

From the day of his birth, Damu has always been an outcast. The son of the chief and brother to the great warrior leader, Damu is reminded constantly that he’s not good enough to be considered a man in the eyes of his people. Ordered to take responsibility for Alé, Damu shares with him the ways of the Maasai, just as Alé shares with Damu the world outside the acacia thorn fence. But it’s more than just a cultural exchange. It’s about trust and acceptance, finding themselves, and a true sense of purpose.

Under the African sky on the plains of the Serengeti, Heath finds more than just a reason to live. He finds a man like no other, and a reason to love.

Publisher: BlueHeart Press
Release Date: June 23, 2016
Length: 262 pages
Purchase: Amazon (KU)

Ciao, darlings.

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